Infographic: With Facebook on the Decline, Who’s Next?

Nov 30, 2012 by     1 Comment     Posted under: Business, Culture & Politics, Internet, Social Media
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This infographic was submitted to us by Satellite Broadband ISP, who also provided this description:

Facebook has been around since many of the people who use it can remember. For me, it was right around the time I was beginning college and I couldn’t wait to get a college email so that I could use it.

Now how does Facebook compare to Myspace and some of the other internet giants that have come before it? Could they end up like Myspace? If so, who’s next to take over?

This infographic takes a look at some of the internet giants that have come before Facebook, how they got started, where they are now and how they ended.

I like the concept of the topic — it does seem like Facebook has had some “staying power” in the Internet world, but at some point it’s got to go.

I don’t think the title accurately represents what’s shown here, though, because the bulk of the information is about other sites/services that have already tanked. So it’s not really about “who’s next” but what might happen to Facebook and what has already happened to others.

There’s not much to be said about the design here. The star-like background behind the title doesn’t seem to tie into anything, the bar graph is very basic (and uses three disparate fonts), and the companies described (Facebook, AOL, Yahoo!, MySpace, Friendster) are just haphazardly thrown in. Although it seems that “Challengers to the Facebook Throne” is meant to be the conclusion, my eye didn’t find it that readily — I was trying to figure out which bulleted list to read first, instead.

This infographic would really benefit from a more descriptive title, better organization, more unique design elements, and proofreading. There are lots of inconsistencies in capitalization and punctuation as well as spelling errors. In an ideal scenario, an infographic will be shared across blogs, publications, and social media outlets all over the web — with the company’s name right on there at the bottom. If it’s unattractive and unpolished, it doesn’t present a good image for the company. That’s why attention to design and detail are so critical.

I’d have to give this infographic a D. Unfortunately, I just wasn’t drawn in by the design, I wasn’t clear on what the information would be about, and I couldn’t get past all the typos.



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