Infographic: Halloween by the Numbers

Oct 22, 2012 by     No Comments    Posted under: Culture & Politics, Economics, Holidays
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In connection with Traidcrafts organic food and Wise Bread.

This infographic was submitted to us by Wise Bread.

This infographic takes advantage of all sorts of spooky themes to break up the sections and make the text more exciting to read. I love the pumpkin pie chart. Oh, pumpkin pie! That’s cute… (For you organic food lovers, organic autumn and winter squash are coming into season for delicious holiday treats or pesticide-free jack o’lanterns!) Also, all the iconography and illustrations are great. The extreme use of color could be gaudy in many infographics, but I think because it’s for Halloween, it doesn’t bother me!

I do wish that data visualization was used to its fullest here. The pumpkin chart, as I said, is adorable. It definitely held my attention to read through the data. But the cauldron pie charts are a little less exciting (the pumpkin chart itself was shaped like a pumpkin, whereas these are simple circles) and the sections “American Participation and National Spending,” “How [M]any Americans Participate in the Whole Halloween Experience?” and “Halloween Spending for 2012″ don’t use any data viz. Infographics rely on data viz for visual interest and less emphasis on reading to get the information, so use as much as the design allows and make it creative — depending on your audience.

There are also a few organizational things to consider. The “How [M]any Americans” section could organize the activities by the frequency they’re practiced. Further, “Halloween Spending for 2012″ shows two figures that are average expenditure per person and one figure that is total spend for the whole country, though both costume and pet costume spending are labeled as “Total spend.”

Lastly, there are some capitalization inconsistencies throughout.

All that said, I still love the creative over-the-top design, and there is some great information here. It could just use some proofreading and some more thought to data viz and consistency to make it great. I’d give this infographic a B- overall.



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