Infographic: Finance and Accounting Salary Trends

May 22, 2012 by     No Comments    Posted under: Business, Finance, International
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This infographic was submitted by Robert Half International, who provided this description:

Find out what you’re worth with Robert Half’s salary guides for accounting, finance, technology and administration professionals. Founded in 1948, Robert Half International is the world’s leading specialised recruitment firm and the first to provide placement services for accounting, finance and information technology professionals.

Though this is a very brief infographic–and not that that’s a bad thing–it does a great job of keeping text light, utilizing data viz and staying visually entertaining. It even does this despite the white background and gray accents, maintaining a look of professionalism while being engaging.

It’s clear through both graphs and visual cues which numbers are the most significant. Take the amount CFOs expect salaries to rise–the 34% value is clearly the highest, but it’s also highlighted in blue, making the recognition of its significance instantaneous. The use of iconography mixed with data visualization also spices things up, as in the final graph.

The call to action is well-executed at the bottom, too, not acting as a sales piece but a “learn more here” invitation.

My nit-picky critiques are, well, nit-picky: in the first visualization, I assume that the red characters are representing the 48% that plan to see salaries rise, and the remaining white characters don’t expect salaries to rise. So why is the white character on the end jumping/rising? If anything I think he’d be a bit downtrodden that salaries won’t be rising. Also, in the headline “for those that expect to increase salaries,” I’d think that “for” should be capitalized–and “that” could be changed to “who”. But again, small details. (It’s also a little odd to see the logo at the top and bottom of the infographic, but not outlandish.)

Overall I’d give this infographic an A-! It does its job briefly, doesn’t linger around too long or beat around the bush, and it appears clean and accurate.



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