Infographic: Coffee in Hawaii

Jul 19, 2011 by     No Comments    Posted under: Food & Drink
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This infographic was submitted to us by the good people at The Coffee Mash.com. Here is what they had to say about their infographic on their blog:

Most Hawaiian coffee, which ultimately is exported around the world, comes from the regions of Kauai, Maui, Kona and Molokai. Hawaii produces over 7-million pounds of unroasted coffee per year, and there is nearly 8-thousand acres of coffee farms and plantations around the Hawaiian Islands. Combines, Hawaii produces more than thirteen-hundred pounds of coffee, per acre, per year! As America and the world recovers economically, a leading research firm predicts US coffee consumption will increase. There’s also an increased demand across America for fair trade coffee, and whole bean coffee that is roasted locally. Consumers are becoming increasingly mature in taste when it comes to coffee, and Hawaiian coffee is a satisfying choice. What’s your favorite blend?

This infographic covers an interesting subject matter, but unfortunately I have to give this one a D-. It seems like the designer really tried to give this infographic an edgy, disorganized-but-organized feel, but this infographic is really just all over the place. This infographic is all over the place. Right away, I am unsure where to look for the information and it is hard to keep focus because the infographic does not have a simple flow. There is a lot of data here that is not visualized appropriately, either. All of the percentages and ratios of imperfections per gram of coffee could be visualized with pie charts or bar charts. The “numbers” section could also be visualized graphically. I can only see one graph on this entire infographic, and it could be improved to be more interesting and displayed more prominently.

Overall, this infographic is not up to the current standard. It is lacking a good flow and data visualization, two of the most important components of an infographic. I can see what the designer was working toward in terms of the aesthetic, but it needs a lot of work.



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