Infographic: Are We Driving Our Kids To Drugs?

May 30, 2014 by     No Comments    Posted under: Culture & Politics, Health
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This infographic was submitted to us by Ivory Research, who also provided this description:

Compiling information on so-called ‘smart drugs’ is tough, but a new infographic shows that there is strong evidence about the increase in use and the worrying effects it could be having on our students. With fierce competition for university places, and an even tougher fight for jobs after completing their studies, more and more students are looking at ways to improve their output. Fast becoming a social norm, you can see many undergraduates holed up in the library with seemingly endless energy and no need for sleep.

This may be due to abuse of prescription drugs such as Adderall and Ritalin. Produced to help control the symptoms of ADHD or narcolepsy, these drugs are being sold illegally online, and by students with the conditions who are stockpiling their prescriptions and illegally selling them on. The dangers associated with the sale and use of street drugs seem worlds apart from the ‘typical’ smart drug users – white, male, undergraduates at highly competitive colleges. Indeed, 1 in 10 Cambridge students, and 7% of Oxford students are thought to use these drugs.

What message is it sending that it is not illegal for them to do so? What will this lead to in their careers? This worrying trend could be setting up our smartest and brightest for an uncertain future.

There are some sections, like “How Common Are They?” that do a really good job of balancing text and imagery, keeping all instances of text fairly short. There are others, like “Legal Implications” and “Do They Work?” that have way too much text, tempting the viewer to just skim rather than read through all the info.

I actually really like the design of this infographic, but it needs to thin out the text (by deleting copy as well as by breaking existing copy up into smaller, 1-2 line bits) to be more successful.

In all I’d give it a B due to that!



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