Generic Names for Soft Drinks by County Infographic

Sep 13, 2010 by     No Comments    Posted under: Culture & Politics, Featured, Food & Drink, Geography
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Generic Names for Soft Drinks by County
Infographic Brought to you By Pop Vs. Soda

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Some call it pop, some say soda, while others just call it coke. Whatever generic name you use for soft drinks has a deeper meaning than you may think, as certain areas of the United States use different terms. This infographic was created by Matthew T. Campbell from East Central University in Oklahoma, and it looks at the data behind the different terms used in the U.S. for soft drinks. The data is a bit older, but the general trends are most likely still true with regards to different counties across the U.S. that use different terms that all mean soft drink.

In Texas and much of the south, people refer to their soft drinks as Coke. This makes sense because the Coca-Cola brand started in Atlanta in the late 1800′s, and people started to generically refer to it as coke. This went on for so many years, that the term coke is still embedded in popular culture in the south, and therefore they just say coke when they refer to a soft drink.

In California and much of the Northeast, they refer to soft drinks as Soda, which derived from the use of soda fountains that dispensed the soft drinks. Most of the other states in the Midwest and Northwest seem to use the word Pop to refer to their soft drinks. Often called soda pop, it looks like this part of the country took the second half of the term while California and the Northeast took the first part.

Overall the data is very insightful, but aesthetically this infographic could use a major face lift and have additional photos and data about the industry and consumers who love soft drinks.



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