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Foods to fight colds and flu.

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We have over 200 viruses that cause colds and flu. Avoiding stress and having enough sleep are some of the ways of preventing getting a cold. However, watching what you eat is the most effective preventive measure. Below are a few foods you need to include in your budget once cold season rolls around.

Onions, garlic and leeks.
Garlic is not a darling to many because of its strong smell. However it has been highly regarded as a potent antibiotic. Garlic is also effective in boosting our immune system and also works as an antiviral agent.
When you combine onions, garlic and leeks they form a broad spectrum antiseptic. Garlic is also effective in opening clogged sinuses.

(b). Honey
Honey is usually hyped as a cure-all. This is quite true since it cures almost everything from burns, to cuts and grazes. Honey has a natural antiseptic property. It works more like hydrogen peroxide in cuts and scrapes.
Honey is also a great cold and flu sore throat reliever. It has antioxidant and antimicrobial properties. This property helps in fighting infections caused by bacteria, viruses and fungi. However, it should not be administered to children less than one year.

(c). Yoghurt
Lactobacillus reuteri is a bacterium found in yoghurts. This bacterium inhibits the reproduction of viruses that raid your body once you get sick. You should however be cautious while buying yoghurts because not all brands contain this bacterium.

(d). Black pepper
Black pepper is best known for causing sniffles. Ironically the same spice can be used to treat colds. When mixed with vinegar and ground ginger, they increase absorption of over-the-counter medications. Black peppercorns contain a compound known as piperine which contains pain-relieving and anti-fever properties.

(e). Water, juice and decaffeinated tea
Cold and flu virus thrive well in dried-out nasal passages and throats. Drinking plenty of water throughout the day moistens the mucous membranes. Moistened mucous membranes are more capable of trapping viruses. Then you either swallow or blow them out. Therefore, they don’t get a chance of making you sick.

This infographic is provided by Visit Kitchenapparatus

We have over 200 viruses that cause colds and flu. Avoiding stress and having enough sleep are some of the ways of preventing getting a cold. However, watching what you eat is the most effective preventive measure. Below are a few foods you need to include in your budget once cold season rolls around. Onions, garlic and leeks. Garlic is not a darling to many because of its strong smell. However it has been highly regarded as a potent antibiotic. Garlic is also effective in boosting our immune system and also works as an antiviral agent. When you combine onions, garlic and leeks they form a broad spectrum antiseptic. Garlic is also effective in opening clogged sinuses. (b). Honey Honey is usually hyped as a cure-all. This is quite true since it cures almost everything from burns, to cuts and grazes. Honey has a natural antiseptic property. It works more like hydrogen peroxide in cuts and scrapes. Honey is also a great cold and flu sore throat reliever. It has antioxidant and antimicrobial properties. This property helps in fighting infections caused by bacteria, viruses and fungi. However, it should not be administered to children less than one year. (c). Yoghurt Lactobacillus reuteri is a bacterium found in yoghurts. This bacterium inhibits the reproduction of viruses that raid your body once you get sick. You should however be cautious while buying yoghurts because not all brands contain this bacterium. (d). Black pepper Black pepper is best known for causing sniffles. Ironically the same spice can be used to treat colds. When mixed with vinegar and ground ginger, they increase absorption of over-the-counter medications. Black peppercorns contain a compound known as piperine which contains pain-relieving and anti-fever properties. (e). Water, juice and decaffeinated tea Cold and flu virus thrive well in dried-out nasal passages and throats. Drinking plenty of water throughout the day moistens the mucous membranes. Moistened mucous membranes are more capable of trapping viruses. Then you either swallow or blow them out. Therefore, they don’t get a chance of making you sick. This infographic is provided by Visit Kitchenapparatus

Score from the experts at Killer Infographics

Visual Communication - 60%
Design - 50%
Content/Script - 40%
Usability - 65%

54%

Final Grade

This infographic presents some information about fighting illness with certain foods. The opening set of data — and copy throughout the piece — is full of helpful, relevant information, but the typos and grammatical errors lessen the piece's credibility, as do the large chunks of text in the second half of the piece. The contrasting illustration styles as well as the mix of illustration and photography create dramatic tone shifts that a reader might find confusing. Overall, the inconsistencies in this infographic create a visual challenge for the reader and bury some of the key points. We'd give this an F.

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