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An Insider’s Guide To Getting The Coolest Job in China

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Why should I teach English in China?

Oh my – where do we even begin? The opportunity to live and work in China is quite literally the opportunity of a lifetime. For every challenge, there lies a priceless reward, from the solid friendships you will make with locals and colleagues to the immensely rewarding relationships you will build with the people you educate. China does contrast like nowhere else: crumbling temples and neon, superfast subways; ancient tradition and cutting-edge technology – all experienced in a heartbeat.

Chinese New Year is a cultural wonder to behold, and the food is an education all of its own. Travel and transport is cheap and plentiful here (both trains and planes), so you can spend your free time on those long summer holidays exploring more of this fascinating country – gaining new experiences by the day and coming home all the wiser – deeply enriched and enlightened – by your time here. Teaching English in China earns you an honored place within a Chinese community and you will command respect as a teacher in China.

Here’s what one ESL teacher has to say about his time teaching English in China:

“My students and colleagues were some of the most likable people I’ve ever met. Bright, hardworking, confident, and good-humoured, they did everything they could to make me feel at home. They offered to teach me Chinese, bought me gifts, and made me part of their inter-mural teams.”

“Europeans are treated exceptionally well – something of celebrities actually as I was constantly being stopped for group photographs.”
“Looking back on my time in China brings me immense satisfaction. It’s something I feel very proud of and a fantastic memory that will stay with me for the rest of my life.”

Why should I teach English in China? Oh my – where do we even begin? The opportunity to live and work in China is quite literally the opportunity of a lifetime. For every challenge, there lies a priceless reward, from the solid friendships you will make with locals and colleagues to the immensely rewarding relationships you will build with the people you educate. China does contrast like nowhere else: crumbling temples and neon, superfast subways; ancient tradition and cutting-edge technology – all experienced in a heartbeat. Chinese New Year is a cultural wonder to behold, and the food is an education all of its own. Travel and transport is cheap and plentiful here (both trains and planes), so you can spend your free time on those long summer holidays exploring more of this fascinating country – gaining new experiences by the day and coming home all the wiser – deeply enriched and enlightened – by your time here. Teaching English in China earns you an honored place within a Chinese community and you will command respect as a teacher in China. Here’s what one ESL teacher has to say about his time teaching English in China: “My students and colleagues were some of the most likable people I’ve ever met. Bright, hardworking, confident, and good-humoured, they did everything they could to make me feel at home. They offered to teach me Chinese, bought me gifts, and made me part of their inter-mural teams.” “Europeans are treated exceptionally well – something of celebrities actually as I was constantly being stopped for group photographs.” “Looking back on my time in China brings me immense satisfaction. It’s something I feel very proud of and a fantastic memory that will stay with me for the rest of my life.”

Score from the experts at Killer Infographics

Visual Communication - 60%
Design - 70%
Content/Script - 65%
Usability - 70%

66%

Final Grade

This infographic offers some information and tips for someone looking to teach in China. The piece is broken up into areas visually distinguished by color—a great technique to keep information sectioned. Also, the illustration style is consistent throughout the piece, which helps to keep a reader engaged. The visuals all do a nice job of communicating the information at hand, though at times they could be a bit more specific to visualizing specifics and data, when available. The content well organized, concise, and (mostly) error-free. However, at times some of the individual points don't connect to the topic in the clearest way, either due to content or grammar. The list of sources helps to build credibility, though this is slightly negated by a few of the copy's points, which seem a bit skewed. Overall, this infographic has a strong foundation, but it could benefit from just a bit more focus. We'd give this a D.

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